JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC) is reporting that it secured $16.3 million on behalf of aggrieved consumers since the beginning of the financial year.
  • Chief Executive Officer of the CAC, Dolsie Allen made the disclosure during a stakeholder sensitisation meeting on the revised motor vehicle policy held the Institute of Jamaica on Thursday, October 23.
  • She also informed that in the motor vehicle industry, the CAC has so far secured $8.2 million in compensation for consumers.

The Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC) is reporting that it secured $16.3 million on behalf of aggrieved consumers since the beginning of the financial year.

Chief Executive Officer of the CAC, Dolsie Allen made the disclosure during a stakeholder sensitisation meeting on the revised motor vehicle policy held the Institute of Jamaica on Thursday, October 23.

She also informed that in the motor vehicle industry, the CAC has so far secured $8.2 million in compensation for consumers.

It also settled 686 of the 877 complaints received since the start of the 2014/15 financial year, representing a 78 per cent resolution rate.

Mrs. Allen also stated that out of the 82 complaints received from the motor vehicle industry, some 66 of the complaints have been resolved by the CAC.

“We have had complaints where persons purchase a motor vehicle and before they reach home with it, it is overheating and have to take wrecker and come for it. When they take it back, the vendors are giving them a hard time,” Mrs. Allen said.

“When I spend over a $1 million to buy a motor vehicle I expect it to at least drive for more than one day,” she remarked.

Meanwhile, the Chief Executive Officer is urging companies that sell motor vehicles to issue receipts at the point of sale.

“We had a recent case at the CAC where somebody paid $1.2 million for a motor vehicle and didn’t get a receipt. The receipts must have the description of the item, name and address of the vendor, date of the transaction and the amount to be paid by the customer. You must ensure that wherever you go that you get your receipts,” Mrs. Allen said.

For his part, Chief Executive Officer/Trade Administrator at the Trade Board, Victor Cummings, noted that the new motor vehicle policy which came into effect in April, 2014 will be fully enforced.

“I believe that this policy will build a dealers costumer base through direct public relations and a satisfied customer. So we are encouraging you to work with us and if you have a problem we are willing to sit down and work it out, but the policy is in place and it will be enforced,” Mr. Cummings said.

He also reminded businesses that they are not allowed to import a vehicle until they have a license.

“Do not ship the vehicles until you have received the license. Several times we have had the problem where vehicles have been shipped, they land at customs and then there is a breach and the license was never issued. We have also have people applying for the license after it has been shipped,” Mr. Cummings stated.

Jamaica’s Motor Vehicle Policy was revised to adhere to the government’s safety standard of keeping motorist safe on the roadways, through eliminating the importation of motor vehicles which may be faulty or severely damaged in the originating country.