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  • This will ensure that animators can reap the financial benefits from their original works.
  • The Minister told the graduates that work is underway to reform the Copyright Act to make it easier for persons to register their products.
  • The Copyright Amendment Act will allow for regulation and Government oversight of Copyright Collective Management Societies.

Minister of Finance and Planning, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips, is urging young entrants in the animation industry to protect their intellectual property through copyright.

He said this will ensure that they can reap the financial benefits from their original works.

“I would urge all of you to explore all of those aspects of the reality of your industry (and) what it means to register your own intellectual property, so that when you find that mother lode of gold, you will have registered it,” Dr. Phillips said.

He was speaking at the graduation ceremony for the first cohort of students in the ‘Animate Jamaica’ certificate programme, held on February 8 at the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC), University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona.

Twenty eight students graduated during the ceremony held on the Mona campus, while another 15 participants will graduate at UWI’s Montego Bay campus on February 12.

The Minister told the graduates that work is underway to reform the Copyright Act to make it easier for persons to register their products.

The Copyright Amendment Act will allow for regulation and Government oversight of Copyright Collective Management Societies representing the interest of creators and publishers of musical and literary works and producers of sound recordings.

Dr. Phillips said animators also stand to benefit from the recently passed Security Interest in Personal Property Act (SIPP), which will facilitate easier access to loans for business ventures.

“This should enable the establishment of the Central Collateral Registry and should enable your copyright, once you are registered, to count as collateral to get access to credit that you might need to establish your enterprises,” he pointed out.

Dr. Phillips said the legislation “represents a recognition by the Government of a reality on the world’s economy that the most valuable property around nowadays is not so much real property, but intellectual property and other forms of personal property, which count as much in the new economy as real property did in times past.”

He noted that the global animation industry, valued at over US$200 billion, provides an opportunity for Jamaicans. “We don’t need to get 10 per cent of the industry but we can get enough of it to make a difference to our reality,” he noted.

For his part, Director of CARIMAC, Professor Hopeton Dunn, congratulated the students, who participated in the programme.

He noted that the certificate programme is helping to build a new sector for economic development, by providing jobs and business opportunities for a generation of new and creative Jamaicans.

He added that the promotion of Jamaica as a creative hub for cultural enterprises and as an excellent destination for outsourcing animation contracts “is both the opportunity and the challenge that is before us.”

At the ceremony, Glenmar Goldbourne was named the most outstanding performer in the programme, while Nathanael Hay was awarded for earning the highest overall grade.

CARIMAC will begin recruiting and screening the second cohort of students for animation training within two weeks.