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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The access road to Jamaica’s largest landfill, located at Riverton City in St. Andrew, is to be repaired at a cost of US$1 million.
  • The road, which is managed by the NSWMA, has fallen into disrepair, due to heavy usage by compactor trucks.
  • Repairs will be carried out under a collaborative arrangement between the Governments of Jamaica and Mexico.

The access road to Jamaica’s largest landfill, located at Riverton City in St. Andrew, is to be repaired at a cost of US$1 million.

Local Government and Community Development Minister, Hon. Noel Arscott, made the announcement during a visit to the landfill on January 22, to view the roadway.

He was accompanied by the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) Executive Director, Jennifer Edwards, and other officers of the Ministry.

The road, which is managed by the NSWMA, has fallen into disrepair, due to heavy usage by compactor trucks transporting solid waste and other refuse to the landfill, and the effects of the weather.

Mr. Arscott said repairs will be carried out under a collaborative arrangement between the Governments of Jamaica and Mexico, and will be financed through the Mesoamerica equity fund facility.

The facility assists in the execution of activities that will create value for investors and societies. Its business focus is derived from a unique combination of advisory, fund management, and social investment, through the Mesoamerica Foundation.

Global building materials firm, CEMEX, with headquarters in Mexico, will undertake the repairs, which will entail placement of a concrete mix solution along the two kilometre roadway, replacing the traditional asphalt.

Additionally, CEMEX will undertake the requisite preparatory work, where necessary, to smooth bumps and fill potholes, before the concrete mix is laid.

Following the tour, Mr. Arscott told JIS News he expects the repairs to commence in March and should be completed within three weeks.

He informed that the assistance being extended by the Mexican government resulted from discussions  he had with Mexico’s Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency Gerardo Lozano.

“This gift from the Government and people of Mexico is really appreciated.  It will be useful (in alleviating) the dust nuisance for persons who live close to the landfill,” the Minister said.

In welcoming rehabilitation of the road, Mrs. Edwards said the intervention will enhance the efficiency of the NSWMA’s operations.

“The road infrastructure is one of the critical elements of the work that we do. So, the better the road condition, the quicker we will be able to get our trucks in with the waste, and the quicker the turnaround time, the more waste we will be able to collect,” she said.

CEMEX Director of Relations for Latin America and the Caribbean, Olivia Caldwell, said while the firm has carried out several infrastructure projects in Jamaica, this is the first road repair venture.

Ms. Caldwell advised that CEMEX has evolved from a straight concrete supplier to a   construction solutions provider. She said under this new initiative, “we hope to develop infrastructure solutions that last a lot longer than the asphalt solutions that are being used.”