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  • The livestock industry is slated to benefit from an allocation of some $56 million for the upgrading of two abattoirs, facilitate training in animal husbandry, and to increase the availability of breeding stock.
  • The allocation, under the Diversification of the Caribbean Livestock through the Production of Small Ruminants project, has been made in the 2015/16 Estimates of Expenditure, now before the House of Representatives.
  • The project, being funded by the Caribbean Development Bank and the Government of Jamaica, got underway in 2010, and is slated for completion in December 2015.

The livestock industry is slated to benefit from an allocation of some $56 million for the upgrading of two abattoirs, facilitate training in animal husbandry, and to increase the availability of breeding stock.

The allocation, under the Diversification of the Caribbean Livestock through the Production of Small Ruminants project, has been made in the 2015/16 Estimates of Expenditure, now before the House of Representatives.

The abattoirs, located at Bodles in St. Catherine, will be developed for the demonstration of meat fabrication and master butchery.

Part of the allocation will go towards refurbishing the storage shed and equipping the reproductive facility at Hounslow in St. Elizabeth, including procuring fertility tools and equipment; and establishment and maintenance of improved management system for feeding, and animal husbandry.

Also to be undertaken is completion of the procurement of 109 animals for breeding, and procurement of 200 goat embryos for assisted breeding through embryo transfer and artificial insemination.

The project, being funded by the Caribbean Development Bank and the Government of Jamaica, got underway in 2010, and is slated for completion in December 2015.

Up to the end of 2014, 244 animals were purchased comprising 150 ewes, 10 rams, 74 does and 10 bucks, enabling the breeding stock to be increased by 70 per cent, giving a total of 406 animals, inclusive of sheep and goats.

In addition, a classroom and dorm room were established at Hounslow, which facilitated the training of 15 livestock extension officers, and veterinary technicians.

At Bodles, a feeding system was established, and a forage project developed consisting of pangola grass pasture and sorghum. Repairs were also completed on the animal housing facility.