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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The one-week camp was held from July 5 to 12 at the 4-H centre at Rose Hall in Linstead, St. Catherine
  • There are over 70,000 clubbites island wide, age five to 25 years

Some 58 Jamaica 4-H clubbites have benefited from entrepreneurial and life skills training at the organisation’s annual summer camp.

The one-week camp was held from July 5 to 12 at the 4-H centre at Rose Hall in Linstead, St. Catherine, under the theme: ‘Empowering our Youth through Entrepreneurship’. The aim is to prepare them to take their place at the country’s future leaders.

The youngsters, age 13 to 18, from clubs all over the island, participated in home economics, agriculture, leadership, entrepreneurship and etiquette sessions. They also received assistance in writing resumes and job interview tips.

The young people showed off their talents during a concert, and they also participated in a Jamaica night cultural show. The 4-H pledge and creed were reinforced through the daily routines and activities held.

The highlight of the camp was the annual camp king and queen competition, with first time attendees Jonairo Pennycooke and Sandrina Williams, respectively, taking the coveted titles.

Eighteen-year old Jonairo said the camp experience was good and pledged to use the title to motivate other 4-H clubbites to work towards their full potential.

Sandrina, who is also the Jamaica 4-H Clubs’ National Girl of the year, stated that the title “means a lot to me”, and has added to her list of achievements.

The 18-year old stated that she enjoyed the camp, noting that as a first time attendee, she had a lot of expectations and they were all met. “It was well-rounded especially with the home economics, agriculture, leadership, and etiquette sessions. I would like to charge others to participate in 4-H clubs at their schools so they can be a part of the camp,” she urged.

The camp also saw the election of Christopher Wilson of Glemuir High School in Clarendon, as the national president of the Junior Leaders League (JLL). The League was formed to create a nursery of young leaders for the 4-H movement.

Christopher, who has attended previous camps, told JIS News that, “this camp was different from last year’s. This year they taught us entrepreneurship, and it opened my mind a lot. We had to write resumes and do mock interviews. It was basically a training camp for us going into the wider world,” he stated.

At the end of the week, the campers participated in an evaluation session, where they were asked to give an honest assessment of their experience and make suggestions on areas for improvement.

Camp Director for 11 years, and training coordinator for two years, Charlene Butler-Edwards, told JIS News that during the evaluation, “we got to have feedback from campers regarding their likes and dislikes (of the camp). It was very good to hear from them.”

Eastern Regional Secretary of the 4-H Club, Michelle Mantle, said that the young people did extremely well.  “They were very excited and they want the camp to be extended to three weeks or a month,” she told JIS News.

Presenters included representatives from the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF), Small Business Association Jamaica, Jamaica Business Development Corporation, Junior Achievement Jamaica, Jamaica National, LIME, and the Victoria Mutual Building Society.

Sponsors were Virginia Dare, Caribbean Cement, CB Foods Limited, Caribbean Broilers Jamaica Limited, Jamaica Broilers Group of Companies, All P’s Bakery, Island Mist, Stewart’s Trophies, Jamaica Sugar Industry Authority, and Jamaica Macaroni Factory Limited.

The Jamaica 4-H Clubs, which is celebrating 73 years of existence this year, seeks to mobilize, educate and train youth in leadership skills and vocations and influence trainees to develop sustainable livelihoods and become positive contributors to national development.

There are over 70,000 clubbites island wide, age five to 25 years.