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  • The Plant Produce Inspection Branch and the Veterinary Services Division of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries have implemented paperless processing for permits and phytosanitary certificates.
  • All applications for import permits must be made online at www.moatrade.gov.jm website.
  • Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry, Hon. J.C Hutchinson, said the changes came into effect on March 18 and are part of measures to combat the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

The Plant Produce Inspection Branch and the Veterinary Services Division of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries have implemented paperless processing for permits and phytosanitary certificates.

All applications for import permits must be made online at www.moatrade.gov.jm website.

Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry, Hon. J.C Hutchinson, said the changes came into effect on March 18 and are part of measures to combat the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

He noted that the paperless system will make the processing of permits faster and more efficient.

“Import permits that are approved and paid for will be automatically transferred to the Jamaica Customs Agency’s ASYCUDA system as part of our new paperless system,” he said.

Minister Hutchinson was speaking at a digital press conference on March 31.

Turning to other matters, Mr. Hutchinson said that the country’s input providers have assured the Government that they have at least three months of supplies available and there have been firm commitments for replenishment.

“The Government is mindful that a significant proportion of raw material for animal feed, input material such as fertilisers and pesticides necessary for agricultural production are imported into the island,” he noted.

As it relates to the seafood trade, he said there is significant quantity of stock to ensure supply over the next few weeks, and no major disruption in trade is foreseen in the immediate future.

“Jamaica is a major importer of seafood, especially from within the region (Guyana and Suriname). On average, nearly two million kilograms of seafood is imported monthly. If there is any disruption in trade, this food segment will be affected negatively,” he noted.

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