JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Government is investing millions of dollars in the upgrading of water systems in the eastern and western sections of Portland in order to meet growing demand and ensure adequate supply for citizens, particularly during dry periods.
  • Works are being undertaken at Banana Ridge, Charles Town/Kildare, Crystal Spring, New Eden, Stony Hill, Cornwall Barracks and Islington/Nonsuch.
  • The projects are being implemented by Rural Water Supply Limited (RWSL) and the National Water Commission (NWC), and include installation and repair of water tanks, and replacement of pipes and fixtures.

The Government is investing millions of dollars in the upgrading of water systems in the eastern and western sections of Portland in order to meet growing demand and ensure adequate supply for citizens, particularly during dry periods.

Works are being undertaken at Banana Ridge, Charles Town/Kildare, Crystal Spring, New Eden, Stony Hill, Cornwall Barracks and Islington/Nonsuch.

The projects are being implemented by Rural Water Supply Limited (RWSL) and the National Water Commission (NWC), and include installation and repair of water tanks, and replacement of pipes and fixtures.

Ministers without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation Senator the Hon. Pearnel Charles Jr. and Hon. Daryl Vaz, toured the projects on Thursday (January 29) to get a first-hand look at the scope of works being undertaken.

At Charles Town/Kildare, a 100,000-gallon water tank has been installed at a cost of approximately US$250,000 under the NWC’s Tank and Pump Programme.

Minister Charles Jr. said that old water pipes serving the system are being replaced.

“We know that the Charles Town pipes leading from the well to Kildare are old asbestos cement pipes and those need to be replaced, so the ongoing contract now is for the replacement of those pipes with ductile iron pipes. That’s going to be at a cost of $38 million to lay the pipes; $65 million for the entire project, including the supply of the pipes,” he said.

Minister Charles Jr. said that the work being done will ensure that there is continuous water supply for the residents served by the system.

“The investment that is being made by this government for the people, is one that is going to be long-lasting. This is what we want to do across the country,” he said.

He noted that an evaluation will be one of the entire parish, which was one of the hardest hit by drought conditions in 2019.

“The forecast for this year is no different, so we are taking a proactive approach,” he said.

For his part, Minister Vaz, who is also the Member of Parliament for Western Portland, said that climate change has altered the rainfall pattern in Portland.

“The western end of the island, like Hanover, St. James and Westmoreland, is now getting the bulk of the rainfall, which Portland used to get,” he noted.

“What we are doing here is also in keeping with climate resilience, because the truth is, what we are accustomed to in terms of rainfall, and using rainfall harvesting as the major source of water for the residents of Portland, is no longer, and therefore, projects like this will be for the sustainable future of the parish and of the people,” he pointed out.

Skip to content