G-G Reiterates Call for More Mentors for Boys

Photo: Michael Sloley Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen (right), greets boys from Chetolah Park Primary School (from left) Jordon Cousley and Tyler Robinson, at the Jamaica Teaching Council’s Boys’ Mentorship Training Programme, which was held at Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston, on Wednesday (June 20).

Story Highlights

  • Governor-General, His Excellency, the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has reiterated his call for more Jamaicans to provide mentorship for boys across the island.
  • At the Jamaica Teaching Council’s Boys’ Mentorship Training Programme, which took place at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston on June 20, the Governor-General said mentorship can save the lives of many of the nation’s boys who are at-risk.
  • “I am particularly interested in mentorship, as it is something very personal to me. All my life I have been mentored, and I have been mentoring young people, whether through teaching, pastoring or administrative leadership,” the Governor-General said.

Governor-General, His Excellency, the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has reiterated his call for more Jamaicans to provide mentorship for boys across the island.

At the Jamaica Teaching Council’s Boys’ Mentorship Training Programme, which took place at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston on June 20, the Governor-General said mentorship can save the lives of many of the nation’s boys who are at-risk.

He emphasised that for more at-risk lives to be saved, more Jamaicans are needed to become mentors.

“I am particularly interested in mentorship, as it is something very personal to me. All my life I have been mentored, and I have been mentoring young people, whether through teaching, pastoring or administrative leadership,” the Governor-General said.

He noted that the age group nine to 25 accounts for 50 per cent of the population of Jamaica, and that successive governments continue to grapple with the chronic problem of the at- risk young men, aged 16 to 25, who are unemployed and unemployable.

“Although many intervention programmes have been introduced, these have only scratched the surface of how to treat with these young people. The sociologists will tell you that there is a direct link between these unattached youth and crime,” he added.

The Governor-General said the Jamaica Teaching Council has set a good example by hosting the three-day Mentorship Training Programme, where educators and others who work with boys participate, with the objective of training them to better reach youth who are at-risk across the island.

“I am pleased that the Jamaica Teaching Council has recognised, and is doing something tangible about improving boys’ education in Jamaica. As you build on this base, and conduct this mentorship programme, I hope that more young men will become involved and will benefit,” he said.

The Governor-General had words of encouragement for the young men who were present.

“Young men, you are in this mentorship programme because people care about you and want you to be the best that you can be. In spite of the challenges faced by young men your age, you also have the greatest promise and potential for Jamaica. I see here, young men who will be the leaders of tomorrow. We could have among us a Councillor, Member of Parliament, Pastor, Prime

Minister, or even a Governor-General. Your mentors want you to become good citizens, efficient professionals, caring husbands and responsible fathers,” he said.

JIS Social