St. Thomas Heritage Sites

Stony Gut

Stony Gut, a small village located in the parish of St. Thomas, is the birth place of Jamaica’s National Hero, Paul Bogle. He was a deacon of the Baptist Church, located in the same village. It was in this village that, what was to be later called the Morant Bay Rebellion, began. Paul Bogle, his brother Moses Bogle, and the people of Stony Gut walked to Spanish Town to air their grievances against the injustices and oppression faced in the Parish to Governor Edward Eyre.

On their return a violent protest, initiated by Paul Bogle, broke out which led to the death of a few militia men and Paul Bogle’s followers. Many of were arrested and punished while Paul Bogle himself was hanged.

The rebellion in the end brought about changes in the poor social and economic conditions of the peasants not only in St. Thomas but throughout the island. The rebellion was also the backdrop to the constitutional change which abolished the old representative system in favour of Crown Colony Government.

 

Morant Point Lighthouse

The Morant Point Lighthouse built in 1841 is listed by the Jamaica National Heritage Trust as a National Monument. It is the oldest lighthouse in the island. Built of cast iron tube, cast in London it is 100 feet long with a diameter of 5 feet at the base, and 3 feet at the cap. It is located in the most easterly point of the Island. The labour used in erecting the Lighthouse was supplied by kru-men from Africa. They were among the free Africans who were brought to Jamaica.

 

St. Thomas Parish Church

The St. Thomas Parish Church in Morant Bay is of brick construction. It was built in 1865 when the original Church situated at Church Corner was abandoned because of dilapidation.

The St. Thomas Parish Church in Morant Bay is of brick construction. It was built in 1865 when the original Church situated at Church Corner was abandoned because of dilapidation. The east wall of the Church has a brick with the date 1865 baked into it.

 

Bath Mineral Spa

The mineral spa or spring at Bath in the parish of St. Thomas was discovered by a run-a-way slave in the 1690s. When he discovered that the water of the mineral spring had healed the wounds that had plagued him for years, he decided to brave the wrath of his master to tell him the good news.

The mineral spring at Bath flows from two (2) rocks, which produces both cold and hot water. The water is mixed before it enters the bathhouses, which are built for guests. The water in the spring is not mixed and so it is very hot. The spring is rich in sulphur and lime and is believed to be very good for the treatment of rheumatic ailments and skin diseases.

 

Morant Bay Fort

Situated behind the Morant Bay Court House overlooking the harbour is the Morant Bay Fort. The fort which was probably built in 1758 was designed for nine guns. The fort is built of brick and cut stone approximately four inches thick. The guns were mounted on elaborate cast iron carriages.

The three guns that remain are 24 pounders manufactured in the early 19th century. At one time there was a magazine and a barracks attached to the fort.

The fort as well as the courthouse was the scene of trouble during the 1865 Morant Bay riots.

 

Heritage Sites by Parish