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  • Minister of National Security, Hon. Robert Montague, says the Government is focused on ensuring the delivery of swift and sure justice as part of measures to tackle crime in the country.
  • Swift and sure justice is part of a five-pillar crime strategy announced by Mr. Montague earlier this year.
  • “Our public spaces and community facilities should make it more difficult for crimes to be committed and contribute to increased citizen security,” he argued.

Minister of National Security, Hon. Robert Montague, says the Government is focused on ensuring the delivery of swift and sure justice as part of measures to tackle crime in the country.

He noted that persons, who are bent on committing serious offences, must become convinced that there are consequences for their actions and that “justice will be served swiftly, justly and surely.”

“Delays in apprehension, prolonged prosecutions and diluted punishment increase the pain of the victims and their loved ones, discourages law enforcers, give comfort to offenders and embolden the criminally inclined,” he contended.

Mr. Montague was addressing a Jamaica Defence Force ‘passing out’ parade at the Moneague Training Camp in St. Ann on June 4.

He informed that discussions are under way on measures to improve the conditions of service of judges and prosecutors; fast-track court cases and clear backlogs; repair courthouses and address the underutilisation of facilities; and improve the use of technology.

Swift and sure justice is part of a five-pillar crime strategy announced by Mr. Montague earlier this year.

The other elements are crime prevention through social development; situational prevention; effective policing; and reducing reoffending.

Tackling the Root  Causes

Minister Montague explained that addressing crime through social development will entail tackling the root causes of criminal activity. These include inadequate housing leading to informal settlements; insufficient family income; weak parent-child relationships; poor educational outcomes; and peer associations that encourage delinquency and gang activity.

Mr. Montague informed that his Ministry will be working with key stakeholders on addressing situational issues contributing to the prevalence of crime, such as limited street lights and overgrown lots.

“Our public spaces and community facilities should make it more difficult for crimes to be committed and contribute to increased citizen security,” he argued.

“We must also tackle illiteracy and improve dispute resolution. Too many issues that can be resolved amicably are left to create conflict. It is said that 37 per cent of our murders are domestically based. We must address that,” he noted further.

Minister Montague said the Government is also committed to a policy of rehabilitation to enable offenders to become productive, law-abiding citizens when they return to society.

“Our correctional service is an important player in our national fight against crime,” he said.