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    • Jamaicans are being urged to regard increased productivity as a strategy for economic recovery, expansion and creation of new enterprises, and creation of jobs.
    • Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier, said productivity is crucial for Jamaica to be investment-stable, and for citizens to reap the gains.
    • The Minister was speaking at a panel discussion on flexi work and Labour Market Reform, held at Emancipation Park, in New Kingston, on Wednesday, May 21.

    Jamaicans are being urged to regard increased productivity as a strategy for economic recovery, expansion and creation of new enterprises, and creation of jobs.

    Speaking at a panel discussion on Labour Market Reform, held at Emancipation Park, in New Kingston, on Wednesday, May 21, Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier, said productivity is crucial for Jamaica to be investment-stable, and for citizens to reap the gains.

    He stressed that to “fulfill the growing expectations of our people for improvement in their standards of living, we have no choice but to radically improve our productivity levels”. The Minister noted the imperative of increased productivity across all sectors.

    “With that burning need to improve productivity and reform of Jamaica’s labour market, this administration strongly believes that by adopting flexible work arrangements, we can set the foundation for economic growth and development,” he added.

    The discussion was held under the theme: ‘Flexi Work for Labour Market Reform and Sustainable Development.’

    Minister Kellier told the gathering that his Ministry is engaging the public and the various stakeholders in discussions and consultations, leading up to the Parliamentary debate on this type of working arrangement, in August.

    “The Ministry began the process with the sensitisation of critical front line staff, including our Labour Officers and Conciliation Officers. We want to increase the public’s understanding of the rights and responsibilities; both as employers and employees, under this critical legislation,” he said.

    Panelists included legal officer at the Labour Ministry,  Carla-Ann Harris-Roper; head of the Hugh Lawson Shearer Trade Union Education Institute, Danny Roberts; General Secretary of the Jamaica Council of Churches; Rev. Gary Harriott; Raymond Eyttle of the Jamaica Employers’ Federation; and Vice President of the Jamaica Confederation of Trade Unions, Helene Davis-Whyte.