JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Jamaican High Commission in London hosted a special tribute to the late cultural icon, Hon. Louise Bennett-Coverley, OM, OJ, MBE, on October 9, as part of its activities to mark Black History Month.
  • The High Commissioner said Miss Lou, as she was affectionately known, is credited with raising the appreciation and mainstream acceptance of Jamaican Patois through her poetry, stories and music.
  • September 7 marked the 96th anniversary of Miss Lou’s birth, and in Jamaica there were several events across the island in recognition of her contribution to Jamaica’s culture.

The Jamaican High Commission in London hosted a special tribute to the late cultural icon, Hon. Louise Bennett-Coverley, OM, OJ, MBE, on October 9, as part of its activities to mark Black History Month.

“Miss Lou has had a very profound impact on Jamaica and Jamaicans across the world,” said Jamaica’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Her Excellency, Aloun Ndombet Assamba.

The High Commissioner said Miss Lou, as she was affectionately known, is credited with raising the appreciation and mainstream acceptance of Jamaican Patois through her poetry, stories and music.

“Those of a certain age will remember waking up on Saturday mornings for   ‘Ring Ding’. Those a little older will remember the many Pantomimes and the long running popular ‘Lou and Ranny’ radio show, where she and another legendary Jamaican, Ranny ‘Maas Ran’ Williams, kept us glued to the radio and laughing at their many adventures,” she reminisced.

September 7 marked the 96th anniversary of Miss Lou’s birth, and in Jamaica there were several events across the island in recognition of her contribution to Jamaica’s culture.

The  event in  London featured  internationally renowned poet and musician, Linton Kwesi Johnson, OD; Dona Croll and  Luke  Williams, who  all  gave their ‘reflections’ on  how  Miss Lou influenced them and their careers.

Mr. Johnson performed ‘Jamaican Woman’ and ‘Rolling Calf’; Luke Williams did ‘No Likkle Twang’ and ‘Uriah Preach’, and Donna Croll did a rendition of ‘Dutty Tuff’. The performances were interspersed with video interviews of Miss Lou speaking about Jamaican proverbs and traditional music.

There was also an open mike section when members of the large audience performed their favourite Miss Lou poem or story.