JIS News

The Deputy Director in the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Jeremy Taylor, was cross examined for a third day today (Feb. 3) at the Commission of Enquiry into the extradition of Christopher Coke.

Under questioning from Attorney-at-Law Patrick Atkinson, Mr. Taylor confirmed that the memoranda of understanding (MoUs) on which the United States is said to have relied in the extradition case, involved law enforcement agencies in Jamaica, the United States and Britain.

He stated that while former National Security Minister, Dr. Peter Phillips had signed the documents, he could not say if he was the only Jamaican signatory.

"The signatures are not identified as to which nations they are from, so I cannot say that Mr. Phillips is the only one who is a Jamaican signatory to this document,"
Mr. Taylor said.

He said that since the documents involved the military they should also have had the signature of former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. P.J. Patterson, who was also Minister of Defence during the creation of the MOUs. He noted however, that he did "not see any signature that purports to be that of Mr. Patterson" on the MOUs.

Meanwhile, Senior Deputy Director in the office of the DPP, Lisa Palmer Hamilton also gave her testimony at the Enquiry. She informed that in August 2009, Lieutenant Colonel Patrick Cole, along with Mr. Taylor spoke with her about the extradition request for Mr. Coke.

"In essence they wanted me to intervene and speak with the Hon. Minister of Justice, Senator Dorothy Lightbourne, because of the request that had been made in relation to Mr. Coke," Mrs. Hamilton said.

"It was with the hope that Mr. Taylor would have been able to take certain documents, which he would have gotten in his possession to the Ministry of Justice so that those documents could have been signed and that it would reduce any possible problems with executing the warrant on Mr. Coke," she told the Enquiry.

The Senior Director told the Commission that during conversation with Senator Lightbourne she explained the contents of the discussions that she had with Mr. Taylor and Lieutenant Colonel Patrick Cole.

"I outlined to her what the purpose of the proposition was to achieve. From my recollection, she indicated that she was not comfortable with that process and she encouraged us to stick with proper procedure," Mrs. Palmer Hamilton said.

The Enquiry continues tomorrow (Feb. 4) with the testimonies of Minister with responsibility for Information Telecommunications and Special Projects, Hon. Daryl Vaz; Former Commissioner of Police, Rear Admiral Hardley Lewin; and Former Chief of Defence, Major General Stewart Saunders.

CONTACT: LATONYA LINTON