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Story Highlights

  • The Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) has devised a new publicity campaign, aimed at addressing the relatively high level of non-compliance and a general lack of knowledge by the public of issues associated with strata living.
  • Manager of the Commission of Strata Corporations Inspectorate, Ainsworth Norton, explained that the Commission has been disseminating the messages in these commercials since its inception.
  • He told JIS News that despite ongoing efforts on the part of the Strata Commission to publicise and explain the various rules, regulations and roles, there seems to be a growing lack of understanding on the part of residents of stratified communities.

The Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) has devised a new publicity campaign, aimed at addressing the relatively high level of non-compliance and a general lack of knowledge by the public of issues associated with strata living.

Two new television and radio commercials have been developed to achieve the Commission’s campaign goal.

Manager of the Commission of Strata Corporations Inspectorate, Ainsworth Norton, explained that the Commission has been disseminating the messages in these commercials since its inception.

He told JIS News that despite ongoing efforts on the part of the Strata Commission to publicise and explain the various rules, regulations and roles, there seems to be a growing lack of understanding on the part of residents of stratified communities.

“Despite the best efforts of the Commission, a significant amount of ignorance and misinformation persists about what it means to own and live in a strata property,” he added.

The commercials were shot using the property of a popular gated community in St Catherine.

Marketing Manager with the Commission of Strata Corporations, Damian Wilson, pointed out that the commercial strategy attempts to use the simplest of forms to convey the information.

“The first commercial addresses the concept of shared ownership and shared amenities as found in strata properties. It also addresses the importance of maintenance fees for the upkeep of these amenities, including swimming pools, tennis and basketball courts, football fields, running track and public recreational parks or common areas,” he said.

The second commercial examines the executive committees, annual general meetings, and annual returns.

“These issues represent the most prominent ones that owners and prospective owners of strata properties need to know. We believe we have explained the issues in a straightforward and interesting manner. Our goal is to see greater compliance with the submission of annual returns. Most importantly, we want persons to appreciate the importance of communal spirit that will manifest itself in fewer disputes and payment of maintenance fees,” Mr. Wilson told JIS News.

Executive Committees of Strata Corporations are made up of three to nine members (proprietors) who are voted in to serve at an annual general meeting (AGM). They will have responsibility for a litany of administrative and management functions, such as budgeting and accounting, management and upkeep of common areas, record-keeping, and making submissions to the Commission. Chief among these submissions are annual returns.

The Registration (Strata Titles) Act requires strata corporations to file with the Commission, within 120 days after the end of the current (financial) year¬, audited financial statements or a copy of the accounts prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. This must be signed by the Chairman of the Corporation and at least one other member of the executive committee.