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  • Minister of Science, Energy and Technology, Hon. Fayval Williams, says strategic investment is needed to advance Electric Mobility (e-mobility) in Jamaica as a path towards sustained economic growth.
  • E-mobility refers to the development of electric-powered vehicles.
  • Minister Williams said that e-mobility is a national priority, as Government seeks to redefine the energy landscape “in order to achieve energy security, energy efficiency, energy resilience and greater energy investment in the country.”

Minister of Science, Energy and Technology, Hon. Fayval Williams, says strategic investment is needed to advance Electric Mobility (e-mobility) in Jamaica as a path towards sustained economic growth.

E-mobility refers to the development of electric-powered vehicles.

Minister Williams said that e-mobility is a national priority, as Government seeks to redefine the energy landscape “in order to achieve energy security, energy efficiency, energy resilience and greater energy investment in the country.”

She noted that the move towards e-mobility aligns with the Vision 2030 goal of 100 per cent access to electricity, and also the country’s renewable energy plan.

“There is an aggressive push for renewable solutions because the Government understands the correlation between access to clean, safe and affordable energy and poverty reduction. Government is committed to improving the quality of lives of the people of Jamaica through a reduction of Co2 emissions and pollutions,” she said.

Minister Williams was addressing a Roundtable Discussion on Electric Mobility in Jamaica held at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James on January 24.

She said that transitioning from non environmentally-friendly fuels to more renewable sources will preserve the environment, while lowering the country’s oil bill.

“Between 2014 and October 2019, Jamaica spent approximately US $8.26 billion to import 125 million barrels of oil. That’s more than an average of US$1.3 billion per year. The transport sector, over the same period, used more than 30.7 million barrels of oil,” she pointed out.

Minister Williams argued that a year-over-year 10 per cent reduction in the oil import bill would help Jamaica bolster the fight against crime, support infrastructural development, health care and education.

She said that the Government intends to foster continued dialogue with policymakers, the private sector and the public on e-mobility as plans progress to accelerate the uptake of renewable energy and advance the Jamaica’s energy transformation.

  The roundtable discussion, hosted by the Ministry, was held ahead of next month’s Fourth Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA) Ministerial Meeting in Montego Bay.