JIS News

Story Highlights

  • CSJP is a social intervention programme aimed at reducing serious crimes and violence in beneficiary communities.
  • “The attendance was good and it was heart-warming to see so many persons turn out and participate knowing they were not hired and will not be paid.”
  • Public Relations Officer for the Parade Gardens CDC, Shane Morgan, says the intervention has paved the way for improved relations among residents of the various communities.

Residents of Parade Gardens and surrounding communities in the south central section of downtown Kingston recently came together to clean and beautify their neighbourhoods and unite for the development of the area.

The exercise, undertaken in response to the threat of the Zika virus, also included Tel-Aviv, Rose Gardens, and Southside, and saw residents joining hands to rid their communities of mosquito breeding sites.

The intervention was undertaken through multi-agency partnership involving the Parade Gardens Community Development Committee (CDC), Citizen Security and Justice Programme (CSJP), HEART Trust/NTA, Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF), Jamaica Defence Force (JDF), Peace Management Initiative (PMI), Social Development Commission (SDC), National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA),

GraceKennedy Foundation, and the Ministry of Health.

Carried out on February 3 and 5, the clean-up activity included the clearing of garbage and other debris, bushing, and painting of kerbs.

There was also a community walk-through and dialogue to promote peace and unity among residents.

Senior Community Action Coordinator, CSJP, Orville Simmonds, tells JIS News that in addition to improving the aesthetics of the area, the exercise aimed to promote unity and peace among residents of the communities.

“With Parade Gardens being a CSJP community, we take great interest in building community relations and cohesion and minimising conflict using the most suitable means available,” he says.

CSJP is a social intervention programme aimed at reducing serious crimes and violence in beneficiary communities.

The intervention commenced on February 1, with the partners providing training in solid waste management and community sanitation, sensitising residents about the Zika virus and how to deal with the threat.

Some 400 unattached youngsters, within the 17 to 30 age group benefitted from the training, and they were also assessed to determine their skills and competencies.

Following the training, 40 environment wardens were selected, who were tasked with maintaining the physical environment of the community, encourage proper garbage disposal and reduce the pile-up of waste.

Mr. Simmonds tells JIS News that CSJP intends to provide vocational skills training for participants, who, based on the results of their individual assessments, are considered at risk.

The participants will also undergo a grade nine assessment, which will identify those in need of remedial training.

Meanwhile, Community Case Management Officer for CSJP, Simoriea Marks, tells JIS News that she was pleased with the community support for the clean-up activity.

“The attendance was good and it was heart-warming to see so many persons turn out and participate knowing they were not hired and will not be paid,” she says.

Michael Edwards from Tel-Aviv says the training was good for him because it gave him a clearer understanding of how and where the mosquitoes breed.

“It feels great to be empowered with information of this nature to pass on to my friends and neighbours. I take this task very seriously and we will do all that is necessary to keep our environs clean,” he says.

Public Relations Officer for the Parade Gardens CDC, Shane Morgan, says the intervention has paved the way for improved relations among residents of the various communities.

“I know that this intervention will have a great impact on crime and violence because most of (the residents) are saying they appreciate the initiative. Most people say they got the opportunity to speak with some people they have not seen in a while,” she shares.