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  • Chief Executive Officer of the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), Lenworth Fulton, is urging all farmers to put measures in place for the dry season.
  • Traditionally, the first dry season begins in December and runs until April. The second dry season usually begins in August and lasts until October.
  • Mr. Fulton pointed out that farmers who are in areas where irrigation is offered should take the time to get their property connected.

Chief Executive Officer of the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), Lenworth Fulton, is urging all farmers to put measures in place for the dry season.

Traditionally, the first dry season begins in December and runs until April. The second dry season usually begins in August and lasts until October.

Last year the country, particularly the farming sector, was hit hard as the drought was long and severe.

Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on February 10, Mr. Fulton said farmers must put in place measures to guard against a similar occurrence.

“Those who do backyard gardening and small poultry operation ensure that you have one or two of the black tanks, so you can catch water from the roof of your house. Larger farmers should work closer with our extension officers. Farmers doing yams should still mulch their crops. It is a very good environmental practice, it conserves moisture and [coupled] with organic strategies, will maintain good soil texture,” he said.

Mr. Fulton pointed out that farmers who are in areas where irrigation is offered should take the time to get their property connected.

For farmers in areas with no easy access, the CEO is urging them to have dialogue with the organization on establishing a pond.

“We can give you some dimensions and we will put an officer specifically out there to work with farmers to dig it, line it and get a solar pump. It’s a $4 or 5 million investment, but it will last you up to 15 years,” he said.

Without adequate water harvesting strategies, farmers will have a difficult time attracting financial support from banks and other funding agencies, Mr. Fulton advised, adding that as no one wants to lend money if the crop is at risk for lack of water.

 

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