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Prime Minister P.J. Patterson has written to British Prime Minister Tony Blair outlining seven areas of concern that were discussed at the Second South Summit of the G77 and China which was held in Doha, Qatar June 15-16th 2005. Mr. Patterson presided over the Summit in the capacity of Chair. He was mandated by the Group to bring to the attention of developed partners, including the G8, issues of critical importance to the developing countries. Mr. Patterson released portions of the letter at a press briefing in St. Lucia where he is attending the 26th meeting of Caricom Heads of Government yesterday (July 4, 2005).
Among the seven areas of concern raised in the letter were the issues of global imbalances in trade, finance, money and technology, the reform of the United Nations, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, making the World Trade Organisation an inclusive, fair, equitable and rules-based organisation and the need for increased financing for development to developing countries.
According to the letter, there was a need for developed countries to meet the internationally agreed targets for ODA of 0.7% of GNP to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20% to LDCs.
The G77 and China was also requesting developed partners to identify innovative support and technical assistance to enable the “full and effective implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Barbados Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States”.
The letter also pointed to the need to create or strengthen national, sub-regional, regional and international mechanism to predict, prevent or mitigate the destructive effects of the increasing incidence of natural disasters, especially in vulnerable developing countries.
Prime Minister Patterson also made a call at the press briefing for a forum that would enable both the developed and developing countries to have dialogue on issues of mutual concern, pointing out that the two groups were always meeting separately.
SEVEN AREAS OF CONCERN IN PM PATTERSON’S LETTER TO PM TONY BLAIR
The need to ensure that the programmes and policies we design to facilitate the process of globalisation, fully respect the principles and purposes of the United Nations Charter and International Law and provide policy space for developing countries to adapt the most appropriate measures for their development.
The need to make the World Trade Organisation (WTO) an inclusive, fair, equitable and rules-based organisation which gives priority to the development dimension of international trade and ensures that the comparative advantage of developing countries is not undermined by protectionist measures.
The need to substantially increase financing for development, especially with respect to:
Developed countries meeting the internationally agreed targets for ODA of 0.7% of GNP to developing countries and 0.15% to 0.20% to LDCs;
Identifying innovative sources of financing to complement existing sources and to provide in a stable and predictable manner;
Attracting financial support and technical assistance to enable the full and effective implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Barbados Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.
The need to address the issue of global systemic imbalances in areas such as trade, finance money and technology and to reform the global financing architecture in manner which would, inter alia, enhance the voice and participating of developing countries in the decision-making processes of the international financial institutions.
The need to ensure that in the context of reform of the United Nations, the issue of development is given the highest priority and that the entire UN system is appropriately strengthened and empowered to support this priority.
The need for mobilisation of resources for attacking poverty and for special attention to the situation in Africa.
The need to create or strengthen national, sub-regional, regional and international mechanism to predict, prevent or mitigate the destructive effects of the increasing incidence of natural disasters, especially in vulnerable developing countries.