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  • This will bring together all regulatory agencies involved in the inspection process to a single location, so that all associated transactions occur in one place.
  • There is to be a simplification and an increase in the transparency of the Government electrical inspection process.
  • The Minister informed that the Jamaica Productivity Centre (JPC) will spearhead the development and delivery of a training programme focused on enabling staff to develop productivity enhancing programmes.

Establishing a One Stop Shop for import/export inspection at the Montego Bay ports is among initiatives to be introduced by Government to cut red tape and improve the ease of doing business in the country.

This will bring together all regulatory agencies involved in the inspection process to a single location, so that all associated transactions occur in one place. One such facility is already operating at Berth 11 in Kingston.

Finance and Planning Minister, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips, made the announcement as he opened the 2014/15 Budget Debate in the House of Representativeson April 17.

Dr. Phillips also pointed out that there is to be a simplification and an increase in the transparency of the Government electrical inspection process. He noted that re-engineering and automation of the process will make it easier for applicants to access the service in a timely manner, and remove much of the difficulty and delay that many developers now face.

​On the matter of national productivity, the Minister informed that the Jamaica Productivity Centre (JPC), in collaboration with the Hugh Lawson Shearer Trade Union Education Institute (HLSTUEI) and Management Institute for National Development (MIND), will spearhead the development and delivery of a training programme focused on enabling staff to develop productivity enhancing programmes in their organizations.

​The measures are part of initiatives to strengthen those areas within the public sector relating to service delivery that will have a direct impact on the private sector’s ability to contribute to sustainable  economic growth.

Dr. Phillips said Jamaica cannot continue to accept its low performance on theGlobal Competitiveness Index, which ranked the country 94th overall out of 148 countries.

He cited several factors relating to the performance of the public sector which have influenced the rankings, including: excessive bureaucracy and red tape; duplication of functions; under-utilization of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT); and poor inter-agency communication and coordination.