JIS News

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  • Communication and Customer Services Manager at the National Works Agency (NWA), Stephen Shaw, says at least 25 per cent of the annual expenditure on mitigation activities could be otherwise utilised, if the country’s drains are not blocked with garbage and debris.
  • Addressing the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) Disaster Preparedness Month press conference in Kingston recently, Mr. Shaw said much work has been undertaken by the NWA to improve roadways and drainage systems under the Major Infrastructure Development Programme (MIDP), but this is being undermined by a lack of social responsibility among users of the roadways.
  • “In some instances, our own actions have already compromised the performance of some of these brand-new drainage features. Recently, along the Mandela Highway, for example, a section of the eastbound carriageway was inundated following the heavy rainfall. While there are existing troughs which run for a couple of kilometres designed to drain the roadway, their capacity was greatly reduced due to impediments, including a large number of PET bottles deposited in the drains,” he said.

Communication and Customer Services Manager at the National Works Agency (NWA), Stephen Shaw, says at least 25 per cent of the annual expenditure on mitigation activities could be otherwise utilised, if the country’s drains are not blocked with garbage and debris.

Addressing the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) Disaster Preparedness Month press conference in Kingston recently, Mr. Shaw said much work has been undertaken by the NWA to improve roadways and drainage systems under the Major Infrastructure Development Programme (MIDP), but this is being undermined by a lack of social responsibility among users of the roadways.

“In some instances, our own actions have already compromised the performance of some of these brand-new drainage features. Recently, along the Mandela Highway, for example, a section of the eastbound carriageway was inundated following the heavy rainfall. While there are existing troughs which run for a couple of kilometres designed to drain the roadway, their capacity was greatly reduced due to impediments, including a large number of PET bottles deposited in the drains,” he said.

“Our gutters, gullies, drains and culverts will only function as well as we keep them clean. I implore all Jamaicans to take the time to ensure that you assist in keeping our waterways clear of garbage and debris,” Mr. Shaw added.