Advertisement
JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Executive Director of National Integrity Action (NIA), Professor Trevor Munroe, has called on Justices of the Peace (JPs) to step up their efforts and assist in the ongoing fight against corruption.
  • Professor Munroe, who was speaking at a Justice of the Peace Sensitisation Session at the Montego Bay Convention Centre, in St. James, on December 6, said JPs have a very important role to play in justice reform programme, and that the country is depending on them to stay the course and continue to respect their Oath of Office.
  • “The NIA has partnered with the Ministry of Justice in the fight against crime and corruption, and also with the aim of reforming our justice system,” Professor Munroe noted.

Executive Director of National Integrity Action (NIA), Professor Trevor Munroe, has called on Justices of the Peace (JPs) to step up their efforts and assist in the ongoing fight against corruption.

Professor Munroe, who was speaking at a Justice of the Peace Sensitisation Session at the Montego Bay Convention Centre, in St. James, on December 6, said JPs have a very important role to play in justice reform programme, and that the country is depending on them to stay the course and continue to respect their Oath of Office.

“The NIA has partnered with the Ministry of Justice in the fight against crime and corruption, and also with the aim of reforming our justice system,” Professor Munroe noted.

“This partnership is also about training, mobilising and motivating you and thousands of JPs across Jamaica to intensify your role as soldiers in the army of integrity. You are already recruits. I remind you that to be appointed a Justice of the Peace, the Governor- General has to be satisfied that you are of unquestionable integrity and command the respect and confidence of your community,” he added.

The Executive Director said while he is aware that many JPs have been going above and beyond the call of duty, now more than ever is the time “Jamaica is calling you” to demonstrate that unquestionable integrity, that continuing service, that discharge of your responsibilities to avoid “partisan, political influences,” as you are enjoined to do by your Code of Conduct.

Professor Munroe said his organisation also has that responsibility to duty above self, noting that “we too in NIA are called upon by Jamaica’s current challenges to intensify our work to build a Jamaica of integrity.”

“Our mission is to combat corruption and to practise our principles of integrity and impartiality,” he added.

Professor Munroe said that in carrying forward “these objectives,” the NIA has supported not only the training of JPs but of officials at other levels in the justice system, in particular, investigators from the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), functionaries in the courts and prosecutors.

“You should note that between 2017 and 2018 we engaged over 250 police investigators and prosecutors in anti-gang training,” he noted.

“We in NIA are now encouraged to see the beginning of the fruits of this training. We thank the Minister and the Justice Ministry for their role in the continuing partnership. We also want to thank the American people and the American Government for assisting Jamaica and NIA with funding,” Professor Munroe said.

Skip to content