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Story Highlights

  • Government is to spend $200 million to construct two kilometres of concrete roadway along the access road to the Riverton City Landfill in St. Andrew.
  • The works will be funded through a donation from the MesoAmerican Fund operated by the Mexican Government.
  • Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Noel Arscott, made the disclosure, while contributing to the 2014/15 Sectoral Debate.

Government is to spend $200 million to construct two kilometres of concrete roadway along the access road to the Riverton City Landfill in St. Andrew.

The works will be funded through a donation from the MesoAmerican Fund operated by the Mexican Government and managed by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS).

Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Noel Arscott, made the disclosure, while contributing to the 2014/15 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on June 17.

He noted that in light of the benefits to be derived, the Ministry is endorsing the use of concrete as one of the preferred paving materials for Jamaica’s roadways, given its life expectancy, hard wearing abilities, load carrying capacity, and competitive price.

“We have to find ways to invest in road construction more efficiently. This Ministry, along with the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing is assessing road construction technologies with the intent of realising value for money in the road sector,” the Minister said.

Mr. Arscott explained that repair of the Riverton roadway is being done to improve utilisation of the landfill, and reduce down-time and operating costs for garbage trucks.

He further informed that the Ministry will also undertake the construction of 20 kilometres of concrete roadways elsewhere after the completion of the Riverton pilot.

Many countries across the globe have used concrete as a suitable material for constructing roadways. In the United States, about 30 per cent of highways are constructed using concrete, while Germany and the Netherlands are also constructing more concrete roads. In the Caribbean, countries like St. Lucia and St. Kitts are also utilising concrete to build roads on hilly terrain.

It is estimated that roads made of concrete remain stable for 13 to 30 years, compared to asphalted surfaces that last for six to 20 years.