JIS News

Consul General to Miami, Ricardo Allicock, has described national hero, Marcus Garvey as a trailblazer and visionary, who reached out to migrant workers throughout his travels, and galvanized Jamaicans wherever he went.
The Consul General was speaking at the 119th anniversary celebrations of the birth of the national hero held on August 17 at the Florida Atlantic University Auditorium in Davie, Fort Lauderdale.
Referring to the efforts of the Jamaican government to mobilize and unite Jamaicans through the Diaspora movement, Mr. Allicock noted that Marcus Garvey, during his time, had tried to influence, inspire and educate persons throughout the United Kingdom and United States, spearheading what turned out to be the largest movement of black people anywhere. Since then, he said, “we have not seen anyone with that vision”. He reminded his audience that Marcus Garvey “stood for us all” in his message of black pride and advocacy for the poor.
Noting that African Americans and Caribbean people shared a common bond and similarities in history, Mr. Allicock called for unity among the groups, and urged the Diaspora to move forward in positively impacting the communities in which they reside.
The Consul General further endorsed the move by the government to spearhead dialogue with the United States Congressional Black Caucus, aimed at exonerating Marcus Garvey’s name in the United States. The event was organized by the Broward County Library, in collaboration with Broward Community College, the Rootz Magazine and Talawah Roots Tonic, and was designed to commemorate the life, work and legacy of Marcus Garvey.
Acclaimed artist, Charles Mills, who addressed the audience, proudly shared his “life-altering experiences” from having met Garvey as a child and related stories from his father Jacob Samuel Mills, who travelled with Garvey as an officer of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA).
The evening’s programme also included audio-visual presentations and spoken word performances by several artistes.