• Feature
    Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Fitz Albert Bailey will be among the more than 140 persons who will be honoured at the virtual National Honours and Awards Ceremony to be held on National Heroes Day, Monday, October 18. He will be conferred with the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer (OD) for his service to the Jamaica Constabulary Force. Photo: Adrian Walker
    Photo: Adrian Walker and Contributed

    Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Fitz Albert Bailey would not trade life as a police officer, serving and protecting the people of Jamaica, for any other career. For him, it is a decision he would make all over again if given the opportunity.

    “For me, if I were to relive my life, it would be JCF (Jamaica Constabulary Force) again and if I can serve an organisation like this in the afterlife it would be JCF. It has been a pleasure, an honour, a privilege. There were lows but the better days are greater than the lower days, there were some lonely moments but it was worth it,” he shares with JIS News.

    Describing himself as a “servant of the public”, the DCP’s career in the Force which began 37 years ago, has seen him moving through the ranks based on a track record of success and a commitment and dedication to help.

    “Joining the JCF, I see myself not as a master, but I see myself as a servant. If you see yourself as lord and master, then you are going to find the way you execute your duty is going to be a little abusive and excessive. So, if we understand the concept of servanthood, that’s how I do my policing. I am a servant of the public and the public expects a certain behaviour, conduct, and I am mindful of those realities right through my career. To be a police officer, it’s not just a work, it’s a calling,” says the 2021 Government of Jamaica national award recipient who is in charge of crime and security.

    He shares that one of his commitments to self since joining the Force is a greater respect for human rights. He explains that while he is mindful of the crime situation in the country, this is a mantra he shares with members of the Force particularly in the execution of their duties.

    “I believe we can execute our job with the highest level of professionalism without abusing people, and that has been my mantra,” he posits.

    Young Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Fitz Albert Bailey. DCP Bailey will be among the more than 140 persons who will be honoured at the virtual National Honours and Awards Ceremony to be held on National Heroes Day, Monday, October 18. He will be conferred with the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer (OD) for his service to the Jamaica Constabulary Force. Photo: Contributed

    DCP Bailey will be among the more than 140 persons who will be honoured at the virtual National Honours and Awards Ceremony to be held on National Heroes Day, Monday, October 18.

    He will be conferred with the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer (OD) for his service to the Jamaica Constabulary Force.

    The senior policeman tells JIS News that he accepts the honour bestowed on him by his country with the highest level of humility.

    “I’m really humbled and grateful for this consideration. I think my only regret is that both of my parents…they are not alive to see it. I accept it with the highest level of humility. Thanks to the team that saw it fit to have vested this to me. I am really grateful,” he notes.

    In accepting the honour, DCP Bailey pledges to play his part in maintaining the dignity and honour of the Force.

    “I will accept, and I will ensure that I will live up to the dignity and honour that’s associated with [the award] and I will continue to maintain the dignity and honor of the JCF and continue to be an upstanding citizen, not only in terms of my service as a police officer but I also serve within the church…I offer voluntary service at the highest level within the Christian church organisation. I am a minister of religion too and I am a marriage officer so I will continue to do that service,” he says.

    DCP Bailey has served in numerous capacities since he joined the JCF but shared that his passion is investigations as he has a “knack for details”.

    “My first assignment was at the Beat and Foot Patrol Division, it was a division where they called us the plaza police, we used to work at the various plazas [in various sections of the corporate area] where I spent just about a year there,” he shares.

    A young Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Fitz Albert Bailey (right) with another member of the Jamaica Constabulary Force. DCP Bailey will be among the more than 140 persons who will be honoured at the virtual National Honours and Awards Ceremony to be held on National Heroes Day, Monday, October 18. He will be conferred with the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer (OD) for his service to the Jamaica Constabulary Force. Photo: Contributed

    He later moved from the Beat and Foot Patrol Division to the Mobile Reserve where he spent just over three years before being assigned to the Fraud Squad.

    “That was an excellent opportunity for me, my own protection and survival as a police officer, and how do I manoeuvre in certain circumstances was enhanced by my going to Mobile Reserve.

    “So I went as a constable at Fraud Squad, went through the ranks, constable, acting corporal, corporal, sergeant, inspector, deputy superintendent and superintendent and I became the head of Fraud Squad. I don’t think any criminal should outwit me, so that’s where my passion really lied as a police; those investigations are very complex, very time consuming, you have to be able to identify details, you have to have that knack for detail,” he explains.

    He informs that when the squad was merged into the Organised Crime Investigations Division (OCID), now Counter Terrorism and Organised Crime, he became the head of that unit.

    In 2012, he was transferred to St. Andrew Central as a Commander of the geographic division. He notes that during this period, community and proximity policing were critical in reducing major crimes in the division.

    “The citizens are key stakeholders in policing…If you are going to be an effective leader, be it a police or not, if you don’t go to the table with credibility, you have to be a credible leader and you have to be somebody who can be trusted… If the citizens don’t trust you, you cannot be successful as a police officer, so you have to build that trust and confidence with the citizens,” he says, noting that he also served a short stint in Clarendon.

    He then returned to Counter Terrorism and Organised Crime where he spent just about a year. “Then I was given the portfolio responsibility for crime that I’ve been at since about 2018. I came here acting until I got promoted and I still maintain this portfolio,” he shares. Crime and violence is a societal problem, he says, that requires all to “join forces to defeat the monster”.

    DCP Bailey attended the McGrath High School and Prospect College in St. Mary. He holds a Master of Science in Psychology and Criminal Investigation from the University of Liverpool; a Master of Science in National Security and Strategies, University of the West Indies Mona and an Associate Degree in Accounting from the Management Institute for National Development (MIND).

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