JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The National Water Commission’s (NWC) artificial groundwater recharge system, being built at Innswood, St. Catherine, is on course for completion by November, this year.
  • Over 75 per cent of the works on the 15-month project, being undertaken at a cost of just over $1 billion, has been completed, since its commencement in August 2014.
  • Activities being carried out include: development of a 36.3 million litre (eight million gallon) capacity raw-water treatment facility; and installation of 2.1 kilometres of pipelines.

The National Water Commission’s (NWC) artificial groundwater recharge system, being built at Innswood, St. Catherine, is on course for completion by November, this year.

Over 75 per cent of the works on the 15-month project, being undertaken at a cost of just over $1 billion, has been completed, since its commencement in August 2014.

Activities being carried out include: development of a 36.3 million litre (eight million gallon) capacity raw-water treatment facility; and installation of 2.1 kilometres of pipelines.

On completion, the system is expected to supply approximately five million gallons of potable water per day, to residents and businesses in sections of St. Catherine, and Kingston.

Water, Land, Environment, and Climate Change Minister, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, along with representatives of the NWC and other stakeholders, visited the project site on Friday, July 30, to view the works.

Speaking with journalists following the tour, Mr. Pickersgill, expressed satisfaction with the progress of the development, and underscored the importance of its implementation, noting that during periods of extended drought, there is need to tap into underground water resources.

“This ground-breaking project, which…will ensure that the water (supplied) is of an acceptable quality,” he added.

Member of Parliament for South Central St. Catherine, where the facility is being built, Dr. Andrew Wheatley, welcomed its implementation, noting that it was “timely”, and also expressed satisfaction with its progress.

“I believe that this project will help alleviate some of the problems we’re experiencing… and will (eventually) provide more access to potable water throughout St. Catherine and the Kingston Metropolitan Region (KMR) region,” he added.

The artificial groundwater recharge project is being executed by the engineering firm, M & M Jamaica Limited, with supervision by Rural Water Supply Limited.

It is being funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).