Retired Farmer Gets PM Award for Giving Back To Community

Photo: D. De La Haye Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness (left), presents the Medal of Appreciation for Service in the category of Community Service and Community Development, to retired Dairy Farmer Herman Grant. The award ceremony was held on April 25

Story Highlights

  • There is a Winston Churchill quote: “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”
  • Mr. Grant started farming in the 1970s, planting coconut, banana and cocoa, before branching out into the dairy industry in the 1980s.
  • He also points to the need for assistance to farmers in accessing tractor service, mechanical support, among other things, as it is extremely expensive for farmers to undertake many of these activities.

There is a Winston Churchill quote: “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”

These words ring true for retired dairy farmer, Herman Grant, who has dedicated his life to the development of his Carron Hall community in St. Mary.

For almost 50 years, he has given back to Carron Hall and the wider parish through his agricultural ventures, support to farmers and voluntary service to schools, children’s homes, and through his church.

In recognition of his contribution, Mr. Grant was, on April 25, awarded with the Prime Minister’s Medal of Appreciation in the category of Community Service and Community Development.

“I appreciate it greatly,” he tells JIS News. “After doing voluntary work in various areas, to know that I have received some recognition after serving for many years, is a good feeling,” he adds.

He says he was always inspired to assist the community and especially farmers, to realise their full potential.

Mr. Grant started farming in the 1970s, planting coconut, banana and cocoa, before branching out into the dairy industry in the 1980s.

He became very active on the Jamaica Dairy Board, interfacing with farmers at various levels and arranging training through the Ministry of Agriculture.

The support extended to produce farmers, through training in crop care, use of chemicals, among other areas.

Mr. Grant helped farmers in getting their crops, such as Scotch bonnet peppers, pumpkin and dasheen, to exporters while he was part of the Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS) in the 1980s.

He also assisted in getting Irish potato seeds imported from Holland and Canada to boost local production.

Outside of agriculture, Mr. Grant, who is an Elder at the Carron Hall United Church, has also given back to his community through voluntary service.

He chaired the Board of the Carron Hall Benevolent Society in the 1990s, where he was instrumental in building a health centre, which still serves numerous communities.

Mr. Grant also chaired the Boards of the Pringles Children’s Home; Carron Hall Primary School; the Guy’s Hill Farmer’s Cooperative; and the Midland Peoples’ Cooperative Bank.

Additionally, he served on the Boards of both Carron Hall and Guys Hill High schools; and is a past president of the local Dairy Farmers’ Federation as well as the JAS Carron Hall Branch.

Though retired, Mr. Grant’s love for farming has not waned and he is now involved in the planting of nutmeg.

He says he wants to see more young people engaged in agriculture.

He also points to the need for assistance to farmers in accessing tractor service, mechanical support, among other things, as it is extremely expensive for farmers to undertake many of these activities.

“If women who are interested in agriculture are assisted in this way, as well as in land preparation, they would be more involved,” he contends.

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