Promoters Must Get Permits to Host Events

Photo: Rudranath Fraser Head of the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s (JCF) Corporate Communications Unit, Superintendent Stephanie Lindsay, addresses a recent JIS Think Tank.

Story Highlights

  • The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is urging party promoters to get the relevant permits before hosting events.
  • Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on December 2, Head of the JCF’s Corporate Communications Unit (CCU), Superintendent Stephanie Lindsay, said party promoters will be prosecuted if they do not abide by the laws and regulations that govern events in the country.
  • Superintendent Lindsay pointed out that promoters must have all the special permits as stated by law. She said these include the permit from the Jamaica Fire Brigade and the Jamaica Music Society, and a spirits licence.

The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is urging party promoters to get the relevant permits before hosting events.

Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on December 2, Head of the JCF’s Corporate Communications Unit (CCU), Superintendent Stephanie Lindsay, said party promoters will be prosecuted if they do not abide by the laws and regulations that govern events in the country.

Superintendent Lindsay explained that organisers need to submit their applications for a permit at least 10 days prior to the event.

She said the request should be made to the superintendent or the senior police officer in charge of the parish/division in which the event is being held.

“Before the permit is granted, you need to provide the officer with accurate information about the type of event, the nature of the event, who your target group is and the number of people that is expected to be in attendance,” she explained.

Superintendent Lindsay pointed out that promoters must have all the special permits as stated by law. She said these include the permit from the Jamaica Association of Composers, Authors and Publishers,   the Jamaica Fire Brigade, and the Jamaica Music Society, and a spirits licence.

“All these things will have to be presented to the superintendent before he or she can grant the permit. In the case of Kingston and St. Andrew, there is the KSAC permit that is given at the parish council,” she noted.

She explained that the officer in charge has seven days to assess the documents, inspect the venue and advise whether the permit will be granted.

Superintendent Lindsay noted that if a person is not granted a permit, he or she can appeal within seven days after refusal to the Commissioner of Police, outlining why the decision taken is being contested.

“These laws are to protect the patrons that are coming to your events. Organisers must take into consideration the safety and security of the patrons. We (JCF) want the patrons to be safe,” she emphasised.

The Superintendent said that handing in all the documents does not guarantee the permit to keep the event. “If an investigation is done and the police are not satisfied that you have put adequate security measures in place, you will be advised to do so. If something is happening in a particular community that will impact public gathering, then we will decline the permit,” she added.

She said even though the law gives a minimum requirement of 10 days before the activity, the promoters should not wait until the last minute to apply, but should give themselves enough time in case they need to make an appeal.

Promoters are also urged to abide by the provisions of the Noise Abatement Act. “By law, permission is given to have an event up to 12 midnight during the week and 2:00 a.m. on weekends,” Superintendent Lindsay noted.

She said no police has the right to overturn the law that governs the Noise Abatement Act, so patrons should conform to the times given.

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