Principal Lauds Gov’t for Removing Auxiliary Fees, Increasing PATH Allocation

Story Highlights

  • Principal of Lennon High School, Dr. Donald Johnson, has hailed the Government for removing auxiliary fees and increasing the budgetary allocation to the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH).
  • “The socio-economic status of many parents of students attending school in Jamaica is cause for concern. The Government must, therefore, be commended for the great work they are doing in ensuring that auxiliary fees for all students attending high school are fully paid up. Coupled with that the PATH benefits have also been increased,” he said.
  • Last September, the Government eliminated the payment of auxiliary fees at the secondary level, and increased its subvention to schools from $11,500 to $19,000 per student.

Principal of Lennon High School, Dr. Donald Johnson, has hailed the Government for removing auxiliary fees and increasing the budgetary allocation to the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH).

“The socio-economic status of many parents of students attending school in Jamaica is cause for concern. The Government must, therefore, be commended for the great work they are doing in ensuring that auxiliary fees for all students attending high school are fully paid up. Coupled with that the PATH benefits have also been increased,” he said.

Dr. Johnson was addressing the Gebbers Farms Management and Workers Academic Grants presentation ceremony held at the Ministry of Labour and Social Security’s North Street office in Kingston recently.

Thirteen secondary school students from Clarendon, who are pursuing studies in agriculture, were presented with grants totalling $650,000.

Last September, the Government eliminated the payment of auxiliary fees at the secondary level, and increased its subvention to schools from $11,500 to $19,000 per student.

In her Sectoral presentation in Parliament on April 26, Labour Minister, Hon. Shahine Robinson, said that effective June 1, the allocation to PATH will increase by 30 per cent. More than 360,000 students who are on the programme will benefit.

Gebbers Farms has been involved in the Overseas Employment Programme since 2010.

The scholarships came from the proceeds of the farmworkers’ annual Jamaica Day activities in Brewster, Washington, where the farm is located, and from contributions from the employers.

Last year, 10 students from St. Ann received awards. The aim is to give back to vulnerable Jamaicans in all parishes from which the farmworkers are drawn.

In previous years, the Gebbers Farms workers have made donations to the Vineyard Town Golden Age Home in Kingston; Garland Hall Memorial Children’s Home in St. James; and the Hanbury Children’s Home in Manchester.

JIS Social