Police Issue 106,000 Traffic Tickets

Photo: Mark Bell Commanding Officer of the Traffic and Highway Division of the Jamaica Constabulary Force, Senior Superintendent Calvin Allen (right), addresses JIS ‘Think Tank’ on tickets issued since the beginning of the year, yesterday (March 14). Others (from left) are Director of the Island Traffic Authority, Ludlow Powell and Acting General Manager, HR and Administration at the Transport Authority, Petra-Kene Williams.

Story Highlights

  • The police have issued more than 106,000 tickets for breaches of the Road Traffic Act since the beginning of the year.
  • This was disclosed by Commanding Officer of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Traffic and Highway Division, Senior Superintendent Calvin Allen, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on March 14.
  • According to the senior officer, some of the common breaches include excessive speeding, failure to indicate when turning, improper overtaking, not wearing seat belts, and not wearing a protective helmet.

The police have issued more than 106,000 tickets for breaches of the Road Traffic Act since the beginning of the year.

This represents a 24.5 per cent increase over the corresponding period in 2016 when 83,000 tickets were issued.

This was disclosed by Commanding Officer of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Traffic and Highway Division, Senior Superintendent Calvin Allen, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on March 14.

SSP Allen commended members of the police force for their unwavering efforts on the nation’s roads.

“We are seeing an encouraging increase in the number of prosecutions and I want to recognise the officers for their effective presence in treating with road violations,” he said.

He pointed out that while there has been an increase in the number of police operations, the increase has largely come as a result of drivers flagrantly disobeying the rules of the road.

According to the senior officer, some of the common breaches include excessive speeding, failure to indicate when turning, improper overtaking, not wearing seat belts, and not wearing a protective helmet.

He added that motorcyclists pose major challenges relating to their own safety and that of other road users.

“We continue to prosecute motorcyclists for the non-wearing of protective helmets as well as for unregistered and unlicensed motorcycles,” he noted.

Mr. Allen pointed out that the police do not see enforcement as their sole purpose on the road, adding that the police have also rendered assistance to more than 3,400 motorists since the beginning of 2017.

“We are not out there just prosecuting. There are several motorists with mechanical challenges and we have assisted those persons. In one instance, an officer assisted an elderly gentleman to change a tyre,” he said.

The Senior Superintendent explained that public safety and citizen security remains an important pillar of the work of the traffic division.

“We remain relentless in our joint effort with the Transport Authority and the Island Traffic Authority to bring greater order, safety and discipline to our roadways,” he said.

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