Manning Promises to Supply Jamaica with LNG


Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, Patrick Manning, has given a commitment to fulfill his country’s obligations under the liquefied natural gas (LNG) project, which was reached with the Jamaican government some two years ago.
Mr. Manning, who was addressing a press conference on Tuesday (Feb. 6) at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Montego Bay, following a joint meeting of the CARICOM Prime Ministerial sub-committee on external negotiations and the Caribbean Single Market and Economy, said he would inform the government very soon, on how best the twin island republic would be able to supply Jamaica’s LNG needs.
“The government of Trinidad and Tobago is determined to satisfy its contractual obligations to the government of Jamaica. An agreement was signed in good faith, and it is our determination, notwithstanding statements to the contrary coming from dubious sources,” he stated.
He added that, “it is our determination to satisfy our obligations to the government of Jamaica, as indeed, the government of Trinidad and Tobago satisfies all obligations into which it has freely entered”.
Prime Minister Manning explained that since the signing of the agreement, a number of things have changed with respect to sourcing the supply of LNG for Jamaica, but his government has been looking at all the possible alternatives with a view to fulfilling the agreement.
“We engaged in discussions with the three gas supply companies that were relevant, and I am pleased to report to you that those arrangements have now been completed. We now know from those companies what they can supply in what timeframe,” Mr. Manning told journalists.
In addition, he said, negotiations were being concluded with the government of Venezuela for the development of gas fields that straddle the border between the two countries. Discussions on the agreement were held in Port of Spain on Wednesday (Feb.7).
“We anticipate a complete agreement on this matter within the next few days, by Friday of this week or shortly thereafter,” Mr. Manning said. “When that takes place, then the complete picture will now be available to us, and we will now be in a position to determine how best to supply the needs of Jamaica by way of LNG,” he added.
He indicated that there were still other arrangements, which could be pursued if the necessity arose.
Under the Jamaica/Trinidad and Tobago LNG project, the twin island republic agreed to supply Jamaica with some 160 million cubic feet of LNG per day, over a prescribed period, which would be utilized mainly by the alumina industry.
Expectations are that the project will, in a very significant way, begin to address the trade imbalances between the two countries.

JIS Social