Land Information Council Contributing to Growth of GIS Across Region


The Land Information Council of Jamaica (LICJ) continues to receive praise from regional stakeholders for its capacity to facilitate a more holistic sharing of geospatial data across the public and private sectors in support of national development.

Senior Geographic Information System (GIS) Manager and Trainer at the National Spatial Data Management Division (NSDMD), Simone Lloyd, said the Council has significantly contributed to the growth of the geospatial industry locally, which has transcended to other Caribbean islands in terms of assisting their development.

She said some countries in the region have, over the years, sought to replicate the Council’s structure and collaborative approach.

“How the Council operates has been applauded, especially for the fact that we have been able to facilitate coordination and cooperation in Government and have GIS utilised throughout Government and the private sector,” she pointed out.

Miss Lloyd was speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tankon Wednesday (September 6).

Jamaica is the leading country within the English-speaking Caribbean in GIS, based on the number of agencies that utilise the technology locally in the implementation of projects and programmes.

GIS technology is heavily used in the security and crime-fighting sectors in Jamaica, particularly through the Ministry of National Security, the Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Jamaica Defence Force and a range of private security firms. GIS is also used in emergency preparation and health, among other sectors.

LICJ is administered by NSDMD, an agency of the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, and is comprised of more than 50 institutions – government agencies, tertiary-education institutions and private-sector organisations – that actively utilise geospatial technologies or GIS in their field.

Representatives from the varying agencies collaborate for the development of policies, programmes and projects that advance GIS technology, and which are supported by GIS.

The LICJ has also had local and regional impact through its training programmes at the secondary and tertiary levels, which have prepared scores of persons for the industry.

The Council, established in 1992, is, this year, celebrating its 25thanniversary.

Among events to commemorate the anniversary is an awards ceremony and banquet on November 9 that will recognise various individuals and key agencies that have significantly contributed to the development of the industry locally.

Awards to be presented include the LICJ Award for Contribution towards GIS Education Development, Most Outstanding GIS in Schools Programme (GISSEP), Most Outstanding GIS Professional, and GIS Lifetime Achiever.

“We invite organisations and individuals to nominate persons who they think are fit and who have made a stalwart contribution, and that we would want to recongnise for their contribution,” Ms. Lloyd said.

Nomination sheets are available at gisuserconferenceja.com.

JIS Social