More Cuban Teachers Arrive

Photo: Michael Sloley Some of the 18 Cuban teachers at the start of a two-day orientation exercise organised by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, today (August 29), at Altamont Court Hotel in New Kingston.

Story Highlights

  • Jamaica has welcomed another batch of 18 Cuban teachers, who have been deployed in schools across the island to boost the teaching of the sciences, Spanish and other subjects.
  • Education, Youth and Information, Dr. Grace McLean, said they will be providing wonderful opportunities for Jamaican students to be “immersed in the Spanish language”.

Jamaica has welcomed another batch of 18 Cuban teachers, who have been deployed in schools across the island to boost the teaching of the sciences, Spanish and other subjects.

They have joined 39 other teachers from that country who are serving at various schools – 20 at primary schools, 17 at the secondary level, and two at teacher-training institutions.

Speaking at the start of a two-day orientation exercise for the 18 teachers today (August 29) at Altamont Court Hotel in New Kingston, St. Andrew, Chief Education Officer in the Ministry of

Education, Youth and Information, Dr. Grace McLean, said they will be providing wonderful opportunities for Jamaican students to be “immersed in the Spanish language”.

She said Jamaica is grateful that they have taken up the offer to teach in the schools, and “it will not only provide us with the expertise that you are taking from your country, but it will also assist you in learning about the Jamaican culture”.

For his part, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dean-Roy Bernard, said their input in the education system is crucial, and “we are looking for improvements in Spanish”.

Deputy Chief Education Officer, Dorrett Campbell, informed that the teachers will serve at all levels of the school system, with five assigned to primary schools that have infant departments.

Principal of St. Hugh’s High School, Dr. Elaine Cunningham, in her charge, encouraged the educators to be conscious that they are in a new country, and although, at first, there might be some concern, they should trust the process and this will make a difference.

“If things are not prepared for you the way you want it, just ask,” she said, affirming that at her school, “we are going to have a wonderful time with our Spanish teacher”.

The educators are in Jamaica under an exchange programme through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and Cuba.

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